No, “Love Jones” Does NOT Need A Sequel

“The Best Man Holiday” far exceeded expectations coming in No. 2 during its opening weekend earning just over $30 million.  This post will NOT be a review of the movie, as I told my Facebook friends that I would give them one week (until November 23) to see the movie before I posted about it.  So if you haven’t seen it, you can keep reading as there are no spoilers. 🙂

TBMH was an excellent movie.  Probably exceptional.   I was happy to see the growth and depth of each character.  And I can’t remember ANY movie causing me to feel every emotion imaginable.  And judging from others’ comments, I don’t think I am the only person that feels that way.  Black moviegoers have been trying to tell Hollywood for YEARS that we would like to see us in much more diverse roles.  We’re more than servants or sidekicks or sex kittens.  We are people who have our own stories of triumph and of fears to share…without being in someone else’s shadow.  And if “The Best Man Holiday” didn’t teach us anything else, it taught us that Black people have more than one story to tell.

Some people may think that with the success of a sequel 14 years in the making that most of our beloved movies from the late 1990s/early 2000s deserve a sequel so that we can see what happened to Darius and Nina from “Love Jones”, Sidney and Andre from “Brown Sugar” or Quincy and Monica from “Love and Basketball”.  Well, let me tell you a secret-we don’t.  We don’t even need a Part 3 to “The Best Man”.  Although “Bad Boys 2” came out almost 10 years after the original and did fairly well in the box office, it really wasn’t necessary.  And even though I thorougly enjoyed “Think Like A Man”, “Think Like a Man Too” is overkill.

For the next 3-5 years, we do not need to see an influx of sequels of movies with Blacks as the main characters for moviegoers to see in the theatres.  We need new and different stories to be told.  For example, former NFL player and current director/writer/producer Matthew Cherry is currently working on his next film “Game Time Decision”, which focuses on the decisions and possible consequences, good and bad, that need to be made when players enter into the NFL.

So, let’s not only challenge ourselves; let’s challenge Hollywood to make new movies that tell our story.  We don’t live our lives in circles, so why should we see our movies that way?  We are constantly changing and evolving and growing.  And it’s up to us to dare Hollywood to the do the same.  Until next time, I’m just a Southern girl…in the city.

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Way Back Wednesday-An Ode to Hip Hop

 

Some of the greatest who ever did it

 

I do not claim to be a hip-hop head by any means, but I have some favorite artists, and one of my favorite movies is “Brown Sugar” starring Sanaa Lathan and Taye Diggs.  Not sure if that’s a great representation of a hip-hop movie, but I like it. *shrugs* In any event, I’m really disturbed by the current state of hip hop music.  And I sometimes wonder if it’s the evolution of our world and culture that has sexualized and sensationalized the bling and hood lives.  I also wonder if Biggie and Tupac were still alive, would hip-hop have evolved to its current state?

What happened to the days of “Krush Groove“, “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo“, and other great movies?  And lest we never forget some of the greatest hip hop artists, Run D.M.C., Fab 5 Freddy, OutKast, N.W.A., A Tribe Called Quest, MC Lyte, Salt-N-Pepa, and countless others. I wonder what types of movies would be made with today’s artists.  I can just about imagine the tomfoolery we would see on the big screen if these types of movies were left in the hands of Wacka Flacka Flame, Nicki Minaj, Gucci Mane, Souljah Boy, and the like.  Just listening to the lyrics sometimes hurts my ears, even if I like the beat.  Hip-hop is more than some lyrics over a hot track.  Hip-hop should inspire, elevate, and tell stories.  Now it sells sex and “Pretty Boy Swag”.   I search high and low for quality hip-hop artists to listen to, such as Common, Kanye, Jay, Talib Kweli, and The Roots.  The really sad part is that some of these artists don’t always become mainstream phenoms until they do something like star in a movie or become the house band of a late night show.  Don’t get me wrong-those are definitely great things-and as long as their message is getting heard, I really have no objections.  

So, to hip hop… I hope just as fashion has come full circle, I hope you come full circle, too.  I’m waiting for the day when quality hip hop will become the norm and not the odd man out.  I look forward to the day when I can see you on the big screen again and hear you on the radio.   In the meantime, I’ll continue to search you out on the internet and purchase your albums when they’re released. 

A True Fan,

Elle

My favorite song by Biggie, and my quote my freshman year in high school, “Sky’s the Limit”

Even though ‘Pac isn’t in the video, this is one of my favorite songs by him, “Smile” with Scarface

Lastly, my favorite ‘Pac song, next to “California Love”, “I Ain’t Mad at Cha”